SWORDS INTO PLOUGHSHARES

Welcome to Advanced Imaging's Military and Defense issue. In a war economy, the national commitment is to do what we can to support the military campaign. This issue of AI will illustrate how technology is being employed to safeguard our shores, secure the economy, and preserve the lives and confidence of the American people.

On March 15 of this year, near Fort Bragg, N.C., President Bush said 'At every stage of the War on Terror, I can assure you our actions will be carefully planned and carefully prepared. Our objectives will be clear. We will be deliberate, but when we act, we'll be decisive. I will give clear orders, and I will make sure that you have every tool you need to do your job..." We can only assume that some portion of that $48 billion that has been targeted for the so-called War on Terrorism is going into R&D for those "tools."

Due to the nature of military intelligence, in most instances when dealing with the government, even the component manufacturers are not likely to know beforehand precisely what specific applications their product is intended for--and in those cases, where specific application information is offered, the developers are requested not to discuss it. So while we may not be able to give you definitive answers, we can tell you this somebody made the GIS, display, info, robotics, vision, tracking systems that went into the F22. The IR cameras, sensors, CCDs, and high-speed video were certainly manufactured by professionals. May we be so bold as to suggest that those professionals are already comfortably represented within these pages?

Historically, the products and technologies that emerge from government R&D investments have been assimilated into peacetime technology and assumed positions in security, communications, medicine, transportation and industry. For example, the development of the CAT scan in the 80's was the result of digital imaging analysis research that came out of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Originally developed for space analysis, digital imaging has become a robust technology with applications in quality control, chemistry, metallurgy, ultrasonics, medicine and, of course, aerospace.